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Icarus--Doping Documentary on Netflix

Just finished watching Icarus on Netflix. Great documentary. Interesting how it started out about an amateur athlete documenting his doping for cycling and how he could dope and avoid detection. He stumbles into the Russian state-run doping program which is the focus of the second half of the film. I highly recommend it.

https://www.netflix.com/title/80168079
jayrodAdrienneCraig DkjrunninwchevronAaronWebsteyM_WareMattBrendo78maggieru

Comments

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    I agree. I watched with one of my kids a couple of nights ago. He put his phone down when the Russian said putting the drugs in the ass was better than the thigh and he started bleeding all over. My kid only puts his phone down for video games, paintball, or Star Wars movies. He thought it was pretty interesting how they cheated the system.
    Jennifer Post
    Canadian Division
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    I thought it was very interesting. The writer probably is constantly looking over his shoulder for the FSB
    Jennifer Postmaggieru
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    Can someone explain to me what the he was trying to accomplish in the first act? Was he trying to see how much doping would help him at Haute? Or trying to see if he could beat testing?
    MamaCheetah
    ______


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    He mentioned that the race prior to his experiment that the guys that beat him were on a "whole different level". He was told that testing was easy to beat so decided to try it but his race was screwed by the derailleur issue so he couldn't "confirm" improvement based on race finish time / physical condition after the race, even though is power numbers jumped by 100 W during the doping cycle. Seems to me the doping he did prior to the race followed a basic protocol that would keep him under the radar and then the plan to go to Russia was to really get into a more specific and intensified program.
    Jennifer Post
    Canadian Division
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    edited August 12
    Catlin and Grigory were friends. Bunch of Russian athletes came over to train in LA. Wonder what they were doing???? USA has been pretty dominant in Olympic competition. Are we that good? No.
    jayrodMamaCheetahmaggieru
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    I agree the filmmaker wasn't clear on what he was trying to accomplish in the first act. I watched assuming he wanted to prove how easy it is to pass drug tests and how dirty sport is. I think he also wanted to show how it takes effort to dope. All the injections, monitoring, etc. It's not as easy as eating a steak or drinking a glass of tainted protein powder. Also, I think he personally wanted to test the benefits of doping and see how he felt and how he improved. I think many competitive people have wondered how doping could help them. If they could try it under the guise of making a documentary, I wonder how many people would say no.

    I agree with Emily that USA isn't clean either. I doubt many countries are clean. I just don't think our programs are all state run as shown in the case of Russia. USA might have a wide-spread program on helping hide test results but any coordinated effort of the doping of athletes would be done at the sport organizing body level and not the country level I think. But, I am the gal that believed Armstrong until the bitter end so I what do I know?

    What's most interesting to me is how jaded I've become about results. A perfect example is the women's steeplechase in London yesterday. First time USA women have gone 1-2 in a distance event at Worlds or Olympics. Silver medalist PRed by 15 seconds to podium in her first global competition. One of the best races I've seen in a long time. Sadly, my reactions follow my normal pattern now. Elation for a great race and results followed quickly by doubts. I hate that I question if every athlete is clean or dirty.
    AaronWebsteyM_WarekjrunninBrent_RMamaCheetahmaggieru
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    I agree the filmmaker wasn't clear on what he was trying to accomplish in the first act. I watched assuming he wanted to prove how easy it is to pass drug tests and how dirty sport is. I think he also wanted to show how it takes effort to dope. All the injections, monitoring, etc. It's not as easy as eating a steak or drinking a glass of tainted protein powder.

    I was thinking the same while watching. And then athletes have to worry about random drug testing.

    100w improvement is pretty incredible though.

    I think Catlin was also in 9.79. The 30 for 30 documentary about the 1988 Olympics with Ben Johnson. It was either this one or another documentary I saw him in where he basically said the majority of the track and field athletes, US and worldwide dope.
    Jennifer Post
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    I agree, I don't think the USA is necessarily state sponsored. But, sponsor sponsored--probably.

    And Catlin was in LA. Carl Lewis was in LA. Carl Lewis is the ONLY person in 1988 final in Seoul that NEVER tested positive. Hmmmmm...

    I am just sad all this has made the Olympics (and all sport) look totally different to me. My husband said to me after watching Icarus "still want to be an Olympian now?" I believe there are clean athletes at the Olympics but they are fighting quite the battle to get what they truly deserve from their performances.
    kjrunninAaronWebsteyJennifer Postidking90
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    Me and the hubs watched it yesterday. And when it was done I was like - did he win that fuckin Haute Route yet or what?.... The story took a huge left turn and never got back on course ... #unfullfilled, #rerouting
    maggieruJohns622
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    Yeah, they left that part of the story behind. For sure. I had never heard of Haute Route before the documentary. If you need to get a Haute Route fix, it just started today. Leaders after stage 1 are @iamtedking and his partner @1lauracameron (on IG).
    M_WareCraig DMamaCheetahAaronWebstey
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    edited August 15
    Just started it. Kind of comes off like an AGer that wanted to dope so masked that by making a documentary. I can’t sit still for 2 hours, so this will take days to finish.
    maggieruEvan

    Fattest BQ on record--- *allegedly
    2016 (and last) Rev3 Cedar Point champ- don't google the time though
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    Not having a saddle makes it easier to sit still. (or the complete opposite)
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    Oregon has to be pleased to see the Russian doping Dr. in the doc wearing an Oregon lanyard in his lab. Thankfully they’ve got no scandals there....
    M_Wareidking90Evan

    Fattest BQ on record--- *allegedly
    2016 (and last) Rev3 Cedar Point champ- don't google the time though
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    Triathlon is no exception.
    last year a great example
    one in particular had a terrible im70.3 worlds and looked spent after a long year. disappeared to korea deep in camp. came back what 6 weeks later and blew through the competition without breaking a sweat , it seemed. I hate to be the skeptic, but you just dont get that much improvement from such average performance in such a small amount of time. 2 ironmans in two weeks. I just dont think it is possible. Anyone who has bee through the experience on just one know that it takes an ironman and a safety harness to sit on the dunny for the next week as the legs just dont work. then to do it all again?
    I know it is just the world we live in. no sport is without it.
    It just leaves a bad taste in your mouth.
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    Watched this last night.

    I agree with @Robert Rankin - seems the guy just needed a "moral outlet" to justify doping via the documentary. What a piece of dumb luck that he happened to be connected to Rodchenkov just as all of this was about to go down. I kind of have the feeling this documentary would have tanked if not for the fortuitous connection. (And Rodchenkov being a total weirdo - hah)

    A few months ago the whistleblower Yuliya Stepanova came to a presentation with Travis Tygart at CU Boulder. It was fascinating to hear of how normal it was and how individuals were pressured into the "everyone is doing it" mentality. It's scary to see that assumption even in the age group ranks through this documentary and, likely, in the higher professional ranks (e.g. steeplechase).

    Very, very skeptical. And sad.
    Craig DRobert RankinTad_Machrowiczsimonsen77AlexSEvanJohns622
    insta: @magrusch

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