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Effects of Altitude on Power, Pace, Drinking Ability, etc.

So I recently moved from Asheville, NC (lived at ~2400ft - would regularly train into the 3,000s) to Boulder (~5400) and have definitely noticed the effects on power, pace, cooking, my ability to not get tipsy off of a single beer, etc. There are a few benchmarks on what to expect as far as pace or power (see below) but I've found the entire experience and new expectations-setting to be a bit bewildering. There's not a lot out there when you start to google this.

So now I'm heading to race at St. George, which in my mind is not "at altitude", but others have argued differently. Does anyone have any personal tips for "recalibrating" efforts—especially race efforts—based on the differences in elevation? Any tips in general?


Running: 1+ seconds per 400 meters (4-5 sec/mile) per 1000 feet above 3000 feet of altitude, at 4000 alt = 4-5 sec/mile, 5000 alt = 8-10 sec/mile, 6000 alt = 12-15 sec/mile, 7000 alt = 16-20 sec/mile, 8000 alt = 20-25 sec/mile, etc.
FTP: http://www.joefrielsblog.com/2010/09/altitude-and-aerobic-performance.html
MamaCheetahAaronWebsteyCraig D
insta: @magrusch

Comments

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    For every increase in elevation of 1,000 ft from sea level, you should drink an extra shot of Fireball to counteract the effect of altitude.
    M_WareMamaCheetahKenElPescadoPeladoAaronWebsteymaggieruStruangTad_MachrowiczCraig Ddhr
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    I really hope there is someone who knows something about this. Very interesting.
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    If you train in a hyperbolic chamber, you may find that the effects of changes in altitude are greatly exaggerated.
    idking90maggieru
    Sometimes I tweet... Follow PescadoPelado
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    He's on a roll, let him go.

    Found this at TP, interesting that it shows for acclimatized as well as non-acclimatized. I hope you have a great race!
    By the way, the altitude didn't bother me as much as being slow, overweight, and instantly feeling like I was under the french fry lamps as soon as the Snow Canyon climb started. Hydrate lots in the first half of the bike, that climb is hot and long!



    AaronWebstey

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    When I go from sea level (Nova Scotia) to my in laws place in Loveland, Colorado (similar to Bolder?) I find that the first couple of days are fine, then I go through a period of adaptation, before bouncing back again.

    From what I understand, you either want to show up at altitude and race right away, or wait up to 3 weeks to adapt properly.

    I don't race when I am there, but I still hike and run. My heart rate seems cool with altitude but my RPE is way off. I usually feel the need to slow down by about 15 seconds a kilometer on an easy run.
    AaronWebstey
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    i've heard the same re: either race immediately or go live there for three weeks before. anything in the middle is supposed to be awful
    AaronWebstey


    unofficial non-general counsel for TRS Racing and other TRS-related entities
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    In barely-related news, I used to find the same thing with heat acclimatization (either drop in and race or show up a couple weeks in advance). Not sure if that's a real thing or just my own bias.
    Martin
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    @AaronWebstey it takes generally 3-6 weeks for any real adaptations to occur, so likely not just in your head.
    AaronWebstey
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    In barely-related news, I used to find the same thing with heat acclimatization (either drop in and race or show up a couple weeks in advance). Not sure if that's a real thing or just my own bias.

    Isn't this the Andy Potts approach?

    AaronWebstey
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    From what I've heard, yeah - thus proving that I'm as good as Andy Potts.

    QED
    MartinIanL

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