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Gwen Jorgensen's Secret Project to Conquer the Bike | TRS Triathlon

edited August 2016 in Articles

imageGwen Jorgensen's Secret Project to Conquer the Bike | TRS Triathlon

Santa Monica, CA. – Aug 25th, 2016 – The top female triathlete in the world has a secret. Despite having the most dominant season in...

Read the full story here


KenElPescadoPelado

Comments

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    I'm willing to take you nerds on rides on my Indian Chief if you need to sharpen your skills.
    KenElPescadoPeladoMattAaronWebsteyMartinmbrekk44
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    We like you well enough, @Ben Hobbs, but maybe going nut-to-butt is taking it a bit far. Also not sure you want to experience the 'fear boner' phenomenon.
    Shepherdslickfins_RyanCraig_D
    Sometimes I tweet... Follow PescadoPelado
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    AaronWebsteyAaronWebstey Administrator, Rooster Endurance Member, Rooster Endurance Officers
    Ben Hobbs said:

    I'm willing to take you nerds on rides on my Indian Chief if you need to sharpen your skills.

    Yes please! I can almost smell the leather scent emanating from the back of your jacket.
    slickfins_Ryan
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    KHilgendorfKHilgendorf Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    @Ben Hobbs Is that a new model or a proper Indian? My Dad's got a fully original '53 Chief in the garage.
    M_Ware
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    slickfins_Ryanslickfins_Ryan Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    I need to work on descending too. At IMMT, I never went north of 40 mph. I used to regularly hit 50, but then I witnessed and dealt with my brother having a severe and life-altering head injury, and to be honest I have been very gun-shy since then. I struggle with the concept of whether or not it is worth the potential risk. I worry constantly about putting my family through another awful ordeal. Sometimes at my lower moments I even feel like an asshole for even participating in the sport. During the descents in IMMT though, people were going around me like I was standing still. I could have had a MUCH faster bike split had I not been so scared. But let's talk about this: as an amateur doing this for fun, is it worth the risk? Interested to hear what everyone thinks.
    Kind of wish I was Canadian. Sorry.
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    MattMatt Member, Administrator, Rooster Endurance Member
    IMMT also had plenty of rain, and there are idiots who can't descend Duplessis. Plus there were bad crashes this year during both the 70.3 and the full. That's what happens when you have AG wave starts and 2+ loops on the bike. It's congested, people ride draft in packs and triathletes aren't known for their bike handling skills. So passing (and passing on the left) isn't done correctly, safely and your 5 minutes isn't going to make a huge difference over the course of the race.
    slickfins_RyanCapen
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    Craig_DCraig_D Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    edited August 2016

    Ben Hobbs said:

    I'm willing to take you nerds on rides on my Indian Chief if you need to sharpen your skills.

    Yes please! I can almost smell the leather scent emanating from the back of your jacket.

    Lesson one will probably look like this: #sworry - work computer won't let me imbed

    http://imgur.com/gallery/bXy1BO4
    AaronWebsteyKHilgendorf
    Canadian Division
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    MattMatt Member, Administrator, Rooster Endurance Member
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    AaronWebsteyAaronWebstey Administrator, Rooster Endurance Member, Rooster Endurance Officers
    This is exactly what I had in mind. With dimmer lights and Fleetwood Mac's "Rumours" on repeat in the background.
    M_WareKenElPescadoPeladoCraig_DGasBomb
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    RashRash Member
    @slickfins_Ryan - I am with you. Crashed about 2 years ago on a descent due to the guy in front of me going down and his bike getting tossed back out into the road right in my line. I gave him plenty of space because I thought he looked a little out of control and was taking blind corners too wide, however due to bad luck, his bike launched back onto the road instead of following him off it. I was going somewhere north of 30 mph at the time. Shredded my body and tore a disk in my neck.

    I used to descend well (or fast at least), but now my "oh shit" button gets pressed a lot earlier than it used to meaning I lose minutes on any descents with any sort of corner - both on the road and mountains. My hands are usually cramped by the end of any descent from grabbing so much brake. I tell myself it's ok because it's not worth it to be out of commission again or dead for a hobby. I have a wife and kids to worry about. However, the other part of my brain responds to that sort of talk with, "Grow a pair!"

    Ultimately it isn't worth it, however I know I could go faster and be just as safe. Maybe even safer than panic breaking in a corner.

    slickfins_Ryan
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    RashRash Member
    btw - The a-hole who caused me to crash only scratched his hand up because he managed to slide through some soft sand/leaves off the side of the road. As we were waiting for someone to pick us up, he kept telling me - you got it the easiest because your bike hardly got messed up. Of course he is saying this while I am bleeding all over the road and can't move my head. His rear Easton wheel cracked in half and broke his derailleur, but it was all covered by warranty. My bike, on the other hand, pretty much needed a new groupset - none of which was covered by any warranty - and I had 6 months of medical bills. Great riding buddy!
    slickfins_Ryan
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    @slickfins_Ryan @Rash I'm with you guys. I learned the hard way this season that my size > bike handling ability on steep descents. Those familiar with the Wildflower course should know Lynch Hill. I hit 39.8 mph down the average 7.5% grade and couldn't handle the last turn. Luckily braked to about 33 and landed in some pretty soft dirt, just shredded a pair of brand new GP4000s. The good & bad of this was that it wasn't even in my race, just on my way to rack in transition. Thanks to some teammate encouragement from @Craig Parsons (read: being a cock about it), I still raced the next day and whiplash set in later that week.

    The zig-zag is where I left the pavement. Then, ironically, the flatbed I should've sent my bike down on picked me up.

    Maybe I should go a similar route to Gwen, on a smaller budget, and go dump some quarters into Hang-On at the local arcade?


    AaronWebsteyslickfins_RyanM_Ware
    Sometimes I tweet... Follow PescadoPelado
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    KHilgendorfKHilgendorf Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    Y'all need to sack the fuck up. Just sayin'.

    Or, you know, don't. It's your call. We won't judge you for it. Just don't feel compelled to jump on social media and justify your decision to all of us. We don't care.
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    Thanks for nothing Kyle. Okay, well thanks for letting me borrow your bike still. But watch a friend get cheese-grated by asphalt. Or lemme send you down a mountain as a wobbly fat boy and see how you fare. Then, more to the point, after you do crash we'll see how quickly you jump into the same situation again. Here's your opportunity to humblebrag about what horrible crashes you've endured but continued to ride. Honestly curious to know if you or anyone here has bounced back after a major one - and define a major crash however you like.
    slickfins_RyanGasBomb
    Sometimes I tweet... Follow PescadoPelado
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    Tad_MTad_M Member, Rooster Endurance Member, Level 2 Supporter
    edited August 2016
    Part of what pushed me to triathlon.

    I miss this beautiful bike. Took 3 years to customize to my tastes. The 900 SuperSport is the essence of Ducati magic. I personally think it is their best model ever made. 2 years after this photo, it was stolen on a multi-day group ride. Sadness. I went through 3 more Ducs trying to replace this, including the 1998 FE model of the 900SS. Nothing would do, and this started my gradual detachment from the sport. The blue bike on the left was in the early stages of buildup to be my track racing bike. I did have a major crash on the blue one at the track. I bounced back and rode more on the road and track, but that highlighted the danger to me. The detachment after the theft, combined with the desire to avoid killing myself caused me to walk away from the sport. I have no more urges to ride or race these. Tri fixed that.

    If Gwen wanted to learn, there aren't better guys in the US to teach you skills than the Bostrom brothers. (OK Haydens too, and many more...). Ben and Eric were superb to watch. I saw them early in their career at Mid Ohio whipping up on the field riding the Harleys prior to moving on to the Superbikes. Ben is quite the triathlete and did well in the RAM a couple years ago.


    M_Wareslickfins_RyanGasBombKenElPescadoPelado

    #Sworry 2019 - See you there!
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    KHilgendorfKHilgendorf Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    @KenElPescadoPelado i'm feeling particularly cantankerous currently. That was more a reaction to how people ask a question, then answer it, and justify that answer all in one comment. If you've already decided something, that's cool.

    As for riding, I've broken numerous helmets, trashed both shoulders, lost all skin from knee to ankle, broken a hip, and had numerous minor falls/crashes riding dirt and road. If you ride and race enough, it'll happen. Either you accept the risk and get back on, or you decide to slow down a little and stay comfortable. That's okay. But someone just telling you to sack up won't matter. You have to decide your comfort level with risk.
    Tad_M
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    slickfins_Ryanslickfins_Ryan Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    That's a pretty looking machine, @Tad_Machrowicz.
    Tad_MGasBomb
    Kind of wish I was Canadian. Sorry.
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    Agreed @KHilgendorf on the risk acceptance/aversion aspect. Bouncing back after all that shows that you don't have the apprehension that Gwen and many of us have, whether in anticipation of a crash or after experiencing one first hand (even second hand).

    Some folks may get back up on the horse right away. Others may slow down, or never ride again. I haven't decided to hang it up myself, I want to get better to prevent another crash. Like Dirty Harry said:


    M_Ware
    Sometimes I tweet... Follow PescadoPelado
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    Tad_MTad_M Member, Rooster Endurance Member, Level 2 Supporter

    That's a pretty looking machine, @Tad_Machrowicz.

    Thanks @slickfins_Ryan Here was my final SuperSport. It never was as nice or beautiful as Old Yeller

    M_WareCraig_D

    #Sworry 2019 - See you there!
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    idking90idking90 Member, Pro Triathlete
    Reminds me of an article last summer right before the TDF in the Wall Street Journal on descending:
    Some questions are less technical and more existential. They all affect how hard a rider is prepared to go, Mr. Cancellara said. “Are you young? Are you a bit older? What are your goals? Do you have a family? Do you have kids?”
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB12268843614978254751404581042321720914358
    slickfins_RyanAaronWebsteyKenElPescadoPeladoTad_MA_drizzleCraig_D
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    slickfins_Ryanslickfins_Ryan Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    @idking90 That is a great read. Thanks.
    Kind of wish I was Canadian. Sorry.
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    Tad_MTad_M Member, Rooster Endurance Member, Level 2 Supporter
    +1 @idking90 , very cool article. Unbelievable that Acevedo grabs the stem??? Insane. Howes' quote is also really good.
    Perhaps you are an experienced road racer. I'm confused. The writer states that the riders are feathering their front brake into a corner (to prevent skidding).
    Certainly on a motorcycle, late braking with the front brake deep into a corner at lean angle spells disaster (at the performance limit, the front is more weighted and you are already at the adhesion circle limit, therefore braking will typically wash out the front). The fastest riders will be off the front brake as they lean in, possibly they trail brake a bit with the rear before getting back onto the throttle. But a motorbike has a front bias under braking and then a rear thrust with the throttle to a much different degree than a bicycle, not to mention a moving suspension architecture.
    So is it backwards on a bicycle? Does rear brake cause havoc going into a turn? I'd rather know the right way than find out the wrong ways by the school of hard knocks.

    #Sworry 2019 - See you there!
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    KHilgendorfKHilgendorf Member, Rooster Endurance Member
    Brake before you get to the corner. If you pull the front, it'll wash out just like a moto. If you grab the rear, it'll skid, especially in the corner. They feather the front brakes to scrub a little speed prior to the corner, but don't normally brake hard (the exception being switchbacks), trying to only give up what is needed to make the turn. So much weight is going forward, the rear brake doesn't matter much, so you use the front to more easily gauge the pill needed to slow up.
    Tad_M
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    edited August 2016
    The Van Vleuten crash in slow-mo demonstrates what happens when the rear locks up and fishtails, then the front locks up and introduces you to asphalt. I think the road was also wet, which didn't help

    Sometimes I tweet... Follow PescadoPelado
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    Ouch.

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